Multidetector CT in Quantitative Morphometric Assessment of Post-Menopausal Vertebral Fractures in Black Women of Central Africa

Joseph Médard Kabeya Kabenkama, Lydie Banza Ilunga, Michel Lelo Tshikwela, Jean Mukaya Tshibola, Tozin Rahma, Jean-Marie Mbuyi Muamba

Abstract


Background: Osteoporosis and major Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are identified by WHO as leading cause of death worldwide. Its economic burden is heavy worldwide and in particularly in low income countries. DXA availability is poorly in our country. Spine CT scanner with sagittal reformation images are known for the ease quotation of vertebral fractures by quantitative morphometric system described by Genant et al. (1996). This study aims to determine the rate and the features of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal black women living in Kinshasa/DRC using CT scanner sagittal reconstructions.

Patients and methods: 430 consecutives post-menopausal women referred for Thoraco-lumbar CT scanner from June 2011 to June 2016 were enrolled in this study and theirs CT images used to quote vertebrae.

Results: 12.89% of a total of 4730 vertebrae were fractured whose more than half (7.82%) of grade 1. The fracture rate is lower than in Caucasian and ASEAN and increase with ageing and duration of menopausis (24.51% in 70 years of age and over).

Conclusion: Vertebral fracture global frequency was 12.89%. Vertebral fractures are present in our population and adverse consequences will arises in terms of morbidity and mortality. Lack of infrastucture, health policy and powerty will contributes to boost for a bader pronostics.

The method is reproductible and can be used as routine clinical tools in conditions of poor availability of DXA.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22158/rhs.v2n4p335

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Copyright (c) 2017 Joseph Médard Kabeya Kabenkama, Lydie Banza Ilunga, Michel Lelo Tshikwela, Jean Mukaya Tshibola, Tozin Rahma, Jean-Marie Mbuyi Muamba

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